Between the acts: at home in uncertain times

by Timothy Andrews

In the current pandemic, we find ourselves in a similar situation to that of Virginia Woolf’s audience in Between the Acts. Forced into our homes as a result of lockdown measures, a mirror is held up to us so that we can see the intimacy of our lives under the stark light of history unfolding in the present. Like Woolf’s audience, we too are on the cusp of a new era.

I can’t wait to see what it’s like on the outside now: a postcard from quarantine in downtown São Paulo

by Isabela Capovilla Romanetto and Matheus Capovilla Romanetto

That it was possible to dream in more depth is immediately related to how much more silent the city became. This is not only an effect of the absence of people on the streets, but also of changes in the mobility system, which for some time had less buses, and generally less cars around. Downtown São Paulo is an enemy of dream life.